Five Stories Worth Rereading

With so many books in the world, and with so many of those piquing my interest, I find it difficult to justify rereading certain books. However, there are a few that constantly call me to their worlds, and I oblige. Here, I’ve listed five of these books or series of books that have forced me to heed their requests to be read, reread, and sometimes re-reread.

oz

    1. Wizard of Oz: You can probably blame Hollywood for this one. I’ve been obsessed with the Wizard of Oz in all its forms since I first heard Judy Garland belt out “Over the Rainbow” twenty-five years ago. I buy all versions of the book that I can find and afford. My kitchen and dining room are testaments to my mania. The walls are covered with Oz paraphernalia, both from the movies and books. Whenever I need to escape to Oz, I simply pick up one of the many books by L. Frank Baum.
    2. Black Beauty: Anna Sewell’s novel was one of the first books that I read on my own for fun, and that’s one reason it has stuck with me so much. It’s nostalgic. It draws me back in with memories of reading it by the light of my nightlight and under the covers. To date, I have read the book three times. It is a beautiful and heart-wrenching story. I still cry at certain points in the story.
    3.  The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings: I will never deny that I am a nerd through and through. JRR Tolkien is a literary god in his own right for introducing humans to the world of Elves, Dwarves, Goblins, and Hobbitses.
    4. Harry Potter: This magical world created by JK Rowling is popular for all the right reasons. The books are fun, engaging, and well-written. I credit Rowling for making books that are engaging to both children and adults. The series inspired many people of all ages to start reading. Reading is cool!
    5. The Stupidest AngelA Heartwarming Tale of Christmas Terror: This book is probably the most random choice in this list, but it’s the one that belongs on here the most. I have read Christopher Moore’s comedic Christmas novel a total of five times now. It has become a tradition in the Loebick household to read it every year between Thanksgiving and Christmas, because nothing says “Happy Holidays” like IKEA-loving zombies.

the-stupidest-angel

So I’ve listed five of my favorite literary reads. What books have you read multiple times?

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4 thoughts on “Five Stories Worth Rereading

  1. Like Oz for you, Tolkien is for me. I’m somewhere close to a half dozen reads on both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Years ago I would obsessively buy his books even though I I owned at least a single copy of everything Middle Earth-related. Like he’d ever publish something new (thank you Christopher and Guy lol).

    I like picking up William Gibson’s stuff ever since my first read of Neuromancer – 3 or 4 times each by now.

    Neil Gaiman’s stuff. All of it.

    Potter series. Twice anyway.

    Stephen King. Specifically the Dark Tower series. And The Talisman for some strange reason. It haunts me.

    I’m missing one or two, but there they are. I love each one for whatever reason and I reread and re-reread them all because they’re like sleeping on the floorboards of a Ford Fairmont wagon on the late night trip home from the grandparents.

  2. “Little, Big” by John Crowley. I think I’ve read it at least three times. I’m anxiously awaiting the 25th anniversary limited edition (years in the making and still not done) so I can read it again.

  3. I re-read “Lord of the Rings” about once a decade. I’ve also watched the film cycle at least 3 times.

    A few years ago Sara Leigh pointed me at the 25th Anniversary edition of “Little, Big” and I ordered a copy. Since then I’ve been sternly resisting a re-read in favor of that definitive edition. In the interim I’ve read Crowley’s “Engine Summer” twice. It holds up.

    For sheer entertainment value, re-reading Gaiman and Pratchett’s “Good Omens” and the first couple of Vlad Taltos books by Steve Brust are hard to beat. “The Eyre Affair” by Jasper Fforde also holds up.

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