Little Women: A Review

Little Women is the classic coming-of-age story of the sisters Jo, Amy, Beth, and Meg March written by Louisa May Alcott. The story follows the sisters as they grow-up poor in Massachusetts while their father is away fighting for the Union during the Civil War. They are left in the care of their mother and Hannah the cook. Early on in the story, they are introduced to Laurie, their young next door neighbor who from then on, shares in the girls adventures.

Meg is the eldest, and the only one of the sisters who can remember a time before their father lost his wealth. Jo is the tomboy of the family; she’s also the writer. I admit that she’s the one that I can relate to the most. Amy is the artistic one; however, she also wants to impress in society. Beth is the youngest and gentlest of the March sisters. She is considered the angel of the house. All of the sisters are different from each other, but they are tight-knit and support one another during each of their person trials and tribulations.

Little_Women_1102This is one of those books it seems like every female has read. It’s on several top 100 book lists (Including Amazon’s list of books that everyone must read), and yet I had never read it before. So I decided that 2014 would be the year I would remedy this. I downloaded a dramatic reading of the book from Libribox.org, and have been enjoying the book when I get the chance for the last month or so. It really is a nice little book for everyone to read, especially those who are also coming-of-age. There are ups, downs, and great life lessons to be learned. It’s heartwarming and heart-wrenching. My only complaint is that occasionally there are literary digressions that, for me, took away from the story. For example, in the beginning, the four girls put on a play, and every act is described for no real purpose. If the reader is supposed to get anything from it, it’s lost in all the unnecessary details.

Overall, Little Women a wonderful book. I really enjoyed listening to the audio version (though if you’re prone to crying, you may want to skip listening to it while driving). Now on to listening to its follow-up, Little Men.

4/5 Stars

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