Fall Hike: Or “Let’s go this way”

Sometimes you have to stare at Google maps and try to find a new and interesting place to go hiking. Follow the Appalachian trail north of your normal treks and you may discover a new section that has a road and approach trail that leads right to it.

That’s how we discovered the Appalachian Trail at Addis Gap. The plan was to head to the trail head at the end of Wild Cat Road and hike up to the A.T. and then go for distance.

The drive there was bordering on magical. Peak color, an undisturbed dirt road covered in yellow leaves, and even a water fall along the way. It took a solid 30 minutes to drive down the long, narrow gravel road known as West Wild Cat Rd, and it was certainly a beautiful adventure.

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After being on approach trail (the old end portion of Wild Cat Road) for about 15 minutes, we were met by a couple of cyclists, which meant we had to scramble and get the pups out of the way (we had Scotch and Beans with us). The second dude who road by let us know that more folks on bikes were coming down the mountain.

There was a race going on.

Our secluded hike was going to be interrupted by a lot of people in tight shorts, and our nerves were going to be shot by trying not to have a corgi vs. bike accident.

But we trudged on, luckily being able to see a relatively good distance along the path.

But behold! a fork in the trail. To the left, the continuation of Wild Cat Road/approach trail. To the right, though, was another old forest road, showing up on Google Maps as “Deep Gap Road.”

When we got to the fork, our decision was basically made for us. A large group of cyclists were speedily coming down the mountain from the approach trail. We took the road less traveled, and honey, that made all the difference.

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The rest of the hike was peaceful, and while we were constantly climbing the mountain, the grade was easy. So while we didn’t exactly get to the A.T. this time, we found a place where we can come back to later.

In total, we hiked five miles (2.5 in, 2.5 out). We enjoyed it immensely, and the pups did as well.

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Fall Sensations: Sight

This week is peak color-change week in the North Georgia Mountains. I know this, because I read it about five times in the fifteen minutes I perused Facebook this afternoon. That means that one of the most glorious sites of Autumn has arrived – the leaf change, bringing with it my favorite color palette.

But there’s so much more to see and take in during Fall. It’s not all about the leaves!  Just last week, we were entreated to the glow of jack-o-lanterns. Kids and pets (and adults) took to the streets in the greatest of costumes, and I love looking at those pictures and seeing the creativity.

Mums of many varieties are blooming! I have a patch of white ones in my back yard, and then two other types potted around my property. They make for beautiful late-year color.

And with the cooling weather, comes a rare sighting in these parts – the migration of the Monarch Butterflies as they lopingly make their way South, only occasionally making pit stops here in the North Georgia Mountains.  I’ve seen three so far this year, and they’ve been a treat to behold!

Autumn brings the return of crackling outdoor fires, lighting up the darkness of an early dusk.

And don’t forget that Thanksgiving spread! The food not only smells and tastes delicious, it looks so very inviting and comforting.

And of course, as the color fades from the forests and the leaves slowly flutter to the ground, a new vista emerges. The mountains, hidden for most of the year, become visible once more.

Take a moment and visualize your perfect fall day. What sorts of things do you see and take comfort in?